HEALTHY MOLASSES COOKIES : HEALTHY MOLASSES 

Healthy molasses cookies : Currys cookers



Healthy Molasses Cookies





healthy molasses cookies







    healthy
  • In good health

  • (of a part of the body) Not diseased

  • Indicative of, conducive to, or promoting good health

  • having or indicating good health in body or mind; free from infirmity or disease; "a rosy healthy baby"; "staying fit and healthy"

  • promoting health; healthful; "a healthy diet"; "clean healthy air"; "plenty of healthy sleep"; "healthy and normal outlets for youthful energy"; "the salubrious mountain air and water"- C.B.Davis; "carrots are good for you"

  • financially secure and functioning well; "a healthy economy"











Finally, chewy vegan cookies!




Finally, chewy vegan cookies!





It has taken me many failed attempts to crack this and boy was I determined this time. I followed Dreena's Homestyle Cookies recipe but made a few adjustments so the recipe looks more like this:

1 cup spelt flour
1 tsp baking powder
1?2 tsp baking soda
1?4 cup fruit sugar
1?4 tsp sea salt
1?3 cup apricot syrup (see note)
1?4 tsp blackstrap molasses
1 - 1 1?2 tsp pure vanilla extract
1?4 cup melted soya margarine
1?3 cup non-dairy chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350°F (176°C).
In a bowl, sift in the flour, baking powder, and baking soda.
Add the sugar and salt, and stir until well combined. In a separate bowl, combine the apricot syrup with the molasses and vanilla, then stir in the oil until well combined.
Add the wet mixture to the dry, along with the chocolate chips, and stir through until just well combined (do not overmix).
Place large spoonfuls of the batter on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and flatten a little.
Bake for 12 minutes, until just golden (if you bake for much longer, they will dry out).
Let cool on the sheet for no more than 1 minute (again, to prevent drying), then transfer to a cooling rack.

Makes 8-10 large cookies.

Note: I didn't have the maple syrup and had bought these amazing organic dried apricots the other day, you know the dark kind, not the orange, sulphur coated ones. I soaked these in some water and then poured the lot into a food processor until it resembled the consistency of a syrup.












Sunflower Cookies




Sunflower Cookies





Yummy and chewy! Not too sweet and full of healthy goodies.

1/2 cup Canola Oil
1/2 cup Brown Sugar
1/2 cup molasses
1 egg - beaten
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 tsp hot water
1/2 tsp vanilla
1 cup shelled sunflower seeds
1/2 cup white flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 rolled oats
1/2 cup chocolate chips
1/2 cup raisins
1/3 cup bran
1/2 wheat germ
1 pinch salt

Preheat oven to 350f

In a large bowl - cream together oil, sugar and molasses. Blend in egg and vanilla. Stir baking soda and hot water together and add to molasses mixture.

In another bowl combine all remaining ingredients. Stir into molasses mixture.

Drop small spoonfuls on to a non stick cookie sheet. Or use bakers parchment.

Bake cookies for 10 minutes at 350f. Take care not to over cook as these burn easily.

Very yummy almost healthy cookies.

Should make 5 dozen cookies.











healthy molasses cookies







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HOW TO COOK DUCK BREAST. HOW TO COOK 

How To Cook Duck Breast. Pressure Cooker Red Beans.



How To Cook Duck Breast





how to cook duck breast






    how to
  • Providing detailed and practical advice

  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations

  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.

  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic





    breast
  • meet at breast level; "The runner breasted the tape"

  • Either of the two soft, protruding organs on the upper front of a woman's body that secrete milk after pregnancy

  • A person's chest

  • the front of the trunk from the neck to the abdomen; "he beat his breast in anger"

  • The corresponding less-developed part of a man's body

  • either of two soft fleshy milk-secreting glandular organs on the chest of a woman





    cook
  • Prepare (food, a dish, or a meal) by combining and heating the ingredients in various ways

  • Heat food and cause it to thicken and reduce in volume

  • someone who cooks food

  • prepare a hot meal; "My husband doesn't cook"

  • (of food) Be heated so that the condition required for eating is reached

  • English navigator who claimed the east coast of Australia for Britain and discovered several Pacific islands (1728-1779)





    duck
  • to move (the head or body) quickly downwards or away; "Before he could duck, another stone struck him"

  • A waterbird with a broad blunt bill, short legs, webbed feet, and a waddling gait

  • A pure white thin-shelled bivalve mollusk found off the Atlantic coasts of America

  • small wild or domesticated web-footed broad-billed swimming bird usually having a depressed body and short legs

  • (cricket) a score of nothing by a batsman

  • Such a bird as food











Galapagos Islands-635




Galapagos Islands-635





A tortoise at the Galapagos Giant Tortoise Centre on Isabella

Galapagos Giant Tortoise
The Galapagos tortoise or Galapagos giant tortoise (Geochelone nigra) is the largest living tortoise, native to seven islands of the Galapagos archipelago. The Galapagos tortoise is unique to the Galapagos Islands. Fully grown adults can weigh over 300 kilograms (661 lb) and measure 1.2 meters (4 ft) long. They are long-lived with a life expectancy in the wild estimated to be 100-150 years. Populations fell dramatically because of hunting and the introduction of predators and grazers by humans since the seventeenth century. Now only ten subspecies of the original twelve exist in the wild. However, conservation efforts since the establishment of the Galapagos National Park and the Charles Darwin Foundation have met with success, and hundreds of captive-bred juveniles have been released back onto their home islands. They have become one of the most symbolic animals of the fauna of the Galapagos Islands. The tortoises have very large shells (carapace) made of bone. The bony plates of the shell are integral to the skeleton, fused with the ribs in a rigid protective structure. Naturalist Charles Darwin remarked "These animals grow to an immense size ... several so large that it required six or eight men to lift them from the ground.". This is due to the phenomenon of island gigantism whereby in the absence of natural predation, the largest tortoises had a survival advantage and no disadvantage in fleeing or fending off predators. When threatened, it can withdraw its head, neck and all forelimbs into its shell for protection, presenting a protected shield to a would-be predator. The legs have hard scales that also provide armour when withdrawn. Tortoises keep a characteristic scute pattern on their shell throughout life. These have annual growth bands but are not useful for aging as the outer layers are worn off. There is little variation in the dull-brown colour of the shell or scales. Physical features (including shape of the shell) relate to the habitat of each of the subspecies. These differences were noted by Captain Porter even before Charles Darwin. Larger islands with more wet highlands such as Santa Cruz and the Alcedo Volcano on Isabela have lush vegetation near the ground. Tortoises here tend to have 'dome-back' shells. These animals have restricted upward head movement due to shorter necks, and also have shorter limbs. These are the heaviest and largest of the subspecies.Smaller, drier islands such as Espanola and Pinta are inhabited by tortoises with 'saddleback' shells comprising a flatter carapace which is elevated above the neck and flared above the hind feet. Along with longer neck and limbs, this allows them to browse taller vegetation. On these drier islands the Galapagos Opuntia cactus (a major source of their fluids) has evolved a taller, tree-like form. This is evidence of an evolutionary arms race between progressively taller tortoises and correspondingly taller cacti. Saddlebacks are smaller in size than domebacks. They tend to have a yellowish color on lower mandible and throat. At one extreme, the Sierra Negra volcano population that inhabits southern Isabela Island has a very flattened "tabletop" shell. However, there is no saddleback/domeback dualism; tortoises can also be of 'intermediate' type with characteristics of both. The tortoises are slow-moving reptiles with an average long-distance walking speed of 0.3 km/h (0.18 mph). Although feeding giant tortoises browse with no apparent direction, when moving to water-holes or nesting grounds, they can move at surprising speeds for their size. Marked individuals have been reported to have traveled 13 km in two days. Being cold-blooded, the tortoises bask for two hours after dawn, absorbing the energy through their shells, then becoming active for 8–9 hours a day. They may sleep for about sixteen hours in a mud wallow partially or submerged in rain-formed pools (sometimes dew ponds formed by garua-moisture dripping off trees). This may be both a thermoregulatory response and a protection from parasites such as mosquitoes and ticks. Some rest in a 'pallet'- a snug depression in soft ground or dense brush- which probably helps to conserve heat and may aid digestion. On the Alcedo Volcano, repeated use of the same sites by the large resident population has resulted in the formation of small sandy pits. Darwin observed that: "The inhabitants believe that these animals are absolutely deaf; certainly they do not overhear a person walking near behind them. I was always amused, when overtaking one of these great monsters as it was quietly pacing along, to see how suddenly, the instant I passed, it would draw in its head and legs, and uttering a deep hiss fall to the ground with a heavy sound, as if struck dead." The tortoises can vocalise in aggressive encounters, whilst righting themselves if turned upside down and, in males,











Galapagos Islands-640




Galapagos Islands-640





A tortoise embryo at the Galapagos Giant Tortoise Centre on Isabella

Galapagos Giant Tortoise
The Galapagos tortoise or Galapagos giant tortoise (Geochelone nigra) is the largest living tortoise, native to seven islands of the Galapagos archipelago. The Galapagos tortoise is unique to the Galapagos Islands. Fully grown adults can weigh over 300 kilograms (661 lb) and measure 1.2 meters (4 ft) long. They are long-lived with a life expectancy in the wild estimated to be 100-150 years. Populations fell dramatically because of hunting and the introduction of predators and grazers by humans since the seventeenth century. Now only ten subspecies of the original twelve exist in the wild. However, conservation efforts since the establishment of the Galapagos National Park and the Charles Darwin Foundation have met with success, and hundreds of captive-bred juveniles have been released back onto their home islands. They have become one of the most symbolic animals of the fauna of the Galapagos Islands. The tortoises have very large shells (carapace) made of bone. The bony plates of the shell are integral to the skeleton, fused with the ribs in a rigid protective structure. Naturalist Charles Darwin remarked "These animals grow to an immense size ... several so large that it required six or eight men to lift them from the ground.". This is due to the phenomenon of island gigantism whereby in the absence of natural predation, the largest tortoises had a survival advantage and no disadvantage in fleeing or fending off predators. When threatened, it can withdraw its head, neck and all forelimbs into its shell for protection, presenting a protected shield to a would-be predator. The legs have hard scales that also provide armour when withdrawn. Tortoises keep a characteristic scute pattern on their shell throughout life. These have annual growth bands but are not useful for aging as the outer layers are worn off. There is little variation in the dull-brown colour of the shell or scales. Physical features (including shape of the shell) relate to the habitat of each of the subspecies. These differences were noted by Captain Porter even before Charles Darwin. Larger islands with more wet highlands such as Santa Cruz and the Alcedo Volcano on Isabela have lush vegetation near the ground. Tortoises here tend to have 'dome-back' shells. These animals have restricted upward head movement due to shorter necks, and also have shorter limbs. These are the heaviest and largest of the subspecies.Smaller, drier islands such as Espanola and Pinta are inhabited by tortoises with 'saddleback' shells comprising a flatter carapace which is elevated above the neck and flared above the hind feet. Along with longer neck and limbs, this allows them to browse taller vegetation. On these drier islands the Galapagos Opuntia cactus (a major source of their fluids) has evolved a taller, tree-like form. This is evidence of an evolutionary arms race between progressively taller tortoises and correspondingly taller cacti. Saddlebacks are smaller in size than domebacks. They tend to have a yellowish color on lower mandible and throat. At one extreme, the Sierra Negra volcano population that inhabits southern Isabela Island has a very flattened "tabletop" shell. However, there is no saddleback/domeback dualism; tortoises can also be of 'intermediate' type with characteristics of both. The tortoises are slow-moving reptiles with an average long-distance walking speed of 0.3 km/h (0.18 mph). Although feeding giant tortoises browse with no apparent direction, when moving to water-holes or nesting grounds, they can move at surprising speeds for their size. Marked individuals have been reported to have traveled 13 km in two days. Being cold-blooded, the tortoises bask for two hours after dawn, absorbing the energy through their shells, then becoming active for 8–9 hours a day. They may sleep for about sixteen hours in a mud wallow partially or submerged in rain-formed pools (sometimes dew ponds formed by garua-moisture dripping off trees). This may be both a thermoregulatory response and a protection from parasites such as mosquitoes and ticks. Some rest in a 'pallet'- a snug depression in soft ground or dense brush- which probably helps to conserve heat and may aid digestion. On the Alcedo Volcano, repeated use of the same sites by the large resident population has resulted in the formation of small sandy pits. Darwin observed that: "The inhabitants believe that these animals are absolutely deaf; certainly they do not overhear a person walking near behind them. I was always amused, when overtaking one of these great monsters as it was quietly pacing along, to see how suddenly, the instant I passed, it would draw in its head and legs, and uttering a deep hiss fall to the ground with a heavy sound, as if struck dead." The tortoises can vocalise in aggressive encounters, whilst righting themselves if turned upside down and, in









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HOW TO COOK THE PERFECT FILET MIGNON. HOW TO COOK THE 

How to cook the perfect filet mignon. Tracking cookie wiki



How To Cook The Perfect Filet Mignon





how to cook the perfect filet mignon






    filet mignon
  • small steak cut from the thick end of a beef tenderloin

  • Filets of beef tenderloin usually with no fat

  • A small tender piece of beef from the end of the tenderloin

  • Tenderloins cut 1" - 1?" thick, wrapped with bacon, and seasoned with olive oil and our special Canadian Seasoning. We normally skewer two filets together for grilling.





    perfect
  • The perfect tense

  • being complete of its kind and without defect or blemish; "a perfect circle"; "a perfect reproduction"; "perfect happiness"; "perfect manners"; "a perfect specimen"; "a perfect day"

  • arrant(a): without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers; "an arrant fool"; "a complete coward"; "a consummate fool"; "a double-dyed villain"; "gross negligence"; "a perfect idiot"; "pure folly"; "what a sodding mess"; "stark staring mad"; "a thoroughgoing villain"; "

  • perfective: a tense of verbs used in describing action that has been completed (sometimes regarded as perfective aspect)





    how to
  • Providing detailed and practical advice

  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic

  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations

  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.





    cook
  • English navigator who claimed the east coast of Australia for Britain and discovered several Pacific islands (1728-1779)

  • someone who cooks food

  • Prepare (food, a dish, or a meal) by combining and heating the ingredients in various ways

  • (of food) Be heated so that the condition required for eating is reached

  • Heat food and cause it to thicken and reduce in volume

  • prepare a hot meal; "My husband doesn't cook"











Guilty pleasures: Outback




Guilty pleasures: Outback





I had a craving for a steak, and so I went to Outback Steakhouse and had myself a Ribeye steak. When I grew up, I knew the Ribeye as a Delmonico steak, but a Delmonico can vary from where you are in the world.

A good ribeye is fantastic and cannot be beat. A bad ribeye cut, even if cooked well, is such a disappointment. This one from Outback was a mediocre cut. I probably could've gotten a similar cut from a good butcher (but there is no good butcher in Lansing). It was however cooked to a perfect medium rare. Lately, whenever I go to a restaurant, I get an overcooked steak. Even Dusty's managed to serve me a medium steak. I didn't send it back, but I did make a note to my waitress. This steak was on the rare side of medium rare, which is just how I like it.

Whenever you order a steak, it's a tough thing to do well, to cook just right, so if it's off, I'll let the server know to tell the cook, and if it's spot on, I have no hesitation letting the kitchen know that they did fantastic.

Whenever I'm at Outback, I get fries because I don't really care, so I just get whatever comes out quickly.

My favorite steak is the porterhouse, but I think that's a cop out, because a porterhouse is just a strip steak and filet mignon joined by bone. So, if you disqualify the porterhouse, then my favorite steak is the ribeye.

EDIT - It seems that this steak is actually closer to rare than medium rare, which, as it happens, is how I like my steaks. I now officially feel like an idiot, because I complained at the last steakhouse I went to that they overcooked my steak, but it was actually exactly medium rare. Doh.











Filet mignon...




Filet mignon...





Filets mignons farcis aux shitakes, lardons, echalottes grises et parmesan, puree de panais et aragula montee a la graisse d'oie, verdure et sa reduction de balsamique aux figues, framboises et parmesan.









how to cook the perfect filet mignon







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INFRARED COOKER - INFRARED 

INFRARED COOKER - ANODIZED COOKWARE REVIEW



Infrared Cooker





infrared cooker






    infrared
  • The infrared region of the spectrum; infrared radiation

  • the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum; electromagnetic wave frequencies below the visible range; "they could sense radiation in the infrared"

  • having or employing wavelengths longer than light but shorter than radio waves; lying outside the visible spectrum at its red end; "infrared radiation"; "infrared photography"

  • 'Infrared (IR)' light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength between 0.7 and 300 micrometres, which equates to a frequency range between approximately 1 and 430 THz.





    cooker
  • The Cooker is an album by jazz trumpeter Lee Morgan released on the Blue Note label in 1957. It was recorded on September 29, 1957 and features performances by Morgan, Pepper Adams, Bobby Timmons, Paul Chambers and Philly Joe Jones.

  • A kitchen stove, cooking stove, cookstove or cooker is a kitchen appliance designed for the purpose of cooking food. Kitchen stoves rely on the application of direct heat for the cooking process and may also contain an oven, used for baking.

  • a utensil for cooking

  • An appliance used for cooking food











Morning Pool




Morning Pool





The water at Crab Cooker comes out really, really hot. Make sure you close off the valve when you leave so you don't scald the next visitors.











The Melt grilled cheese cookers




The Melt grilled cheese cookers





Electrolux High Speed Grill panini machines cooking grilled cheese sandwiches at The Melt.

400 volt infrared cooker.









infrared cooker







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MALAYALAM COOKERY - COOKERY 

MALAYALAM COOKERY - COOKTOPS ELECTRIC DOWNDRAFT - DANE COOK EPISODES.



Malayalam Cookery





malayalam cookery






    malayalam
  • Of or relating to this language or its speakers

  • a Dravidian language (closely related to Tamil) that is spoken in southwestern India

  • Malayalam (?????? '''' ), is one of the four major Dravidian languages of southern India. It is one of the 22 scheduled languages of India with official language status in the state of Kerala and the union territories of Lakshadweep and Mahe. It is spoken by 35.9 million people.





    cookery
  • A place in which food is cooked; a kitchen

  • The art or practice or preparing food by boiling, baking, roasting, frying

  • cooking: the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"

  • Cooking is the process of preparing food by applying heat. Cooks select and combine ingredients using a wide range of tools and methods. In the process, the flavor, texture, appearance, and chemical properties of the ingredients can change.

  • The practice or skill of preparing and cooking food











Us in Malayalam




Us in Malayalam





Sean and Anjali written in Malayalam.

Sean is on the left, Anjali on the right. I am trying to learn how to write our names in as many Indian languages as possible. I think one day they will make great his and hers coffee cups.

Malayalam was the first Indian language I learned how to do this in. Thanks Robin for cleaning it up my name from how it was first showed to me and teaching me how to write Anjali.











Mythili malayalam actress photos 09




Mythili malayalam actress photos 09





mythili malayalam actress photos,malayalam actress mythili hot photos,Mythili photos,Brighty Balachandran,actress Mythili,malayalam actress Mythili,Mythili hot photos,Mythili stills









malayalam cookery







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